Dividends: the Fruits of the Market

So August, September and now October is just passing me by since I last looked at FIREplant. Not exactly dedication is it? I am still keeping an eye on the finance bit side of things tho and continuing to read into the markets and news about Brexit and pound and elections and stuff that happens all around the world. And life just goes on…

This is just an update on the Dividends I have earned so far this year. Fruits of the market. Some dividends are paid yearly, some are paid quarterly but the funds that I have picked pays out quarterly dividends. I think it gives me somewhat of a bit of motivation when I can physically see the returns trickling in. Another benefit of quarterly dividends is the chance of rebalancing with the dividends if the portfolio allocation gets out of their desired allocation if I need to, although my level of dividends at the moment is not enough to do anything significant.

2016 Q1 Q2 Q3
VAPX 64.85 66.2
VEUR 132 45.45
VHYL 88.91 67.89
VFEM 25.28 69.63
VUSA 13.18 15.98
Total 0 324.22 265.15

I have not bought any more units since I dipped into the markets, so the dividends are coming off the same number of units I have bought.

Each quarter of dividends current equates to roughly 0.6-1% of the portfolio value, but given that the value of my portfolio has increased 20% since April 2016 it doesn’t seem to bad. A good learning point is that % yield on a portfolio may fall when the value of portfolio increases and vice versa, the % yield may increase when the underlying assets fall in price. Hence, looking solely at the yield doesn’t tell you about the whole picture but may be indicative of how the underlying price of the asset is.

It is interesting to see also that the same number of units for VEUR paid out a third of dividends from the previous quarter or how VFEM paid out 2+x in Q3 compared to Q2. Perhaps this is due to how the underlying companies in VEUR/VFEM pay out their dividends throughout the year or could this be due to other socioeconomical factors? I don’t reckon it matters much it the grand scheme of things but it would be interesting to see what happens next quarter.

All in all, I am quite satisfied so far with my picks and the dividends. Over the course of 1 whole year, the estimated dividends on the whole portfolio would be roughly 2-3%, excluding any underlying volatility of the price of the portfolio. The challenge is to focus on the dividends and try to ignore the volatility of the portfolio. I hope when the volatility shows up as a fall in price of my portfolio, I don’t get the butterflies in the stomach. That is the true test for any investor I reckon. Hence the importance for  Cash as a buffer/reserve as an emergency fund.